Writing Prompt #26

I never know what to do for writing prompt intros. Do I talk about the world? About me? About writing? I guess it’s a reminder that the blank page can always be intimidating. If you’re a writer and you’ve never sat in front of blank page feeling your palms get sweaty and you mind go blank, then I refuse to believe you are human. What is your superpower? Please share your secrets.

The blank page problem is one reason why I like writing prompts so much. The prompt and the time limit don’t give me a chance to procrastinate and feel intimidated. You press go on the timer and out comes a beautiful cascade of word vomit. And any words are better than no words, right?

Name of the game: Snap Shot

The rules: Stare at the picture. What does it make you think of? What story is it telling? Okay–thought of something? Good. Now set a timer to 10 minutes and start writing that story. Ready, set, go!

The image:

Image by Free-Photos from Pixabay 

Writing Prompt #25

I don’t think I was the only one who got the Christmas tree out on December 1st. This year has been A LOT, so I’ve decided I want to focus on festive writing prompts for December. Regardless of what you like to celebrate, I think we all deserve some happiness this month.

Name of the game: Spelling Bee

The Rules: Write down the list of words at the top of your page (notebook, laptop, typewriter–whatever you prefer). You have ten minutes–set a timer–to write whatever comes to mind, using all the words in the list, in whatever order you like, crossing them off as you go. But they ALL have to be in there. Minor alterations are okay, like jump to jumped, but stay reasonable. Are you ready? Go!

The list:

  1. Snowflake
  2. Dance
  3. Breathe
  4. Flame
  5. Fox

If you enjoyed this writing prompt and feel like sharing what you wrote, post it in the comments! I love seeing everyone’s different ideas. Also, of all the different types of writing games I post, which is your favourite?

NaNoWriMo Day 30

Well folks, we made it through November. Whether you are at 7,000 or 70,000 words, be proud of yourself. Heck, even if you didn’t do NaNo, be proud of yourself. 2020 has challenged all of us in new ways, so if you’ve even managed some semblance of ordinary, then well done!

The last* prompt:

Maybe two against five is taking a bet, but when the heel of my boot cracks the first man’s skull, T4Z has already ripped through another’s throat, blood almost not fast enough to stain her knife.

Bit of a violent excerpt from my novel for the last prompt. It if speaks to you, try and write something inspired by it. But mostly, day 30 is about you. Write what you want. It’s the last day, make the most of it–treat yourself by writing whatever it is you want. Add a dragon as a joke, drop everything else and write some poetry. You’ve earned it.

*Okay, not the last prompt. Just the last of my 2020 NaNo prompts. If you’ve followed my blog this month for the prompts, then don’t worry! I normally post a prompt every other Thursday. They’re more geared towards shorter, flash pieces, and I almost always include my own writing for them as well. This way, you can treat the prompt as a game and see all the different ideas that come out of it!

Also, if you’re a new follower, then welcome! It means a lot to me that you’ve chosen to spend time reading my stuff.

Let me know if you want me to do NaNo prompts again next year!

Happy writing!

NaNoWriMo Day 29

Does your story end with a sunset or a sunrise? Real or metaphorical? Will things begin again, or are they over?

Whatever brought your character here–hope, determination, cruel fate–they made a journey they probably never thought they’d make. Are they better for it? Worse off? Do they regret the whole thing?

Traditionally, just before the climax is the darkest part, where all hope is lost. What does your character feel when they reflect on everything that has brought them to this point?

NaNoWriMo Day 28

We are SO CLOSE. Maybe some of you are already done. Right now I am 2,850 words away. This is the first NaNo in three years where I’m actually happy with where my story is. It feels amazing when what your’e writing works, and I sincerely hope that you are all feeling the same!

Today’s prompt:

Out of the ashes, arose a hero.

What does your main character see when they think of a hero? Do they want to be one? Have they already become one? Or are they an anti-hero?

The end of a story usually ends with a choice, and someone rising out of the ashes. It’s up to you who does the rising.

NaNoWriMo Day 27

Today’s prompt:

What is your character afraid of? How will you make them face their greatest fears?

As we near the end of NaNoWriMo, I’m about to attempt my novel’s climax. It feels right to leave it to write last, once I know the best way to push my main character. To force them down to their darkest point, but still expect them to get up and fight back.

So, if you take everything from your character, who is left? Who gets back up?

NaNoWriMo Day 26

Today’s prompt:

Description is one of the hardest things in writing. You don’t want to be too longwinded, but you also want the reader to clearly be able to see the surroundings. You also want them to smell, feel, and taste whatever you’re talking about. Try to focus on a small feature of one of your scenes, like a bunch of grapes, and practice describing it in different ways. Bonus points if you turn the object into a Chekhov’s gun!

NaNoWriMo Day 25

I’m not going to lie–I’m looking forward to taking a break from the daily writing. I’m the sort of person that spends the 11, not November, months looking forward to my annual NaNo, and then November wishing that I hadn’t signed up for such a big committment.

Don’t get me wrong, I LOVE it, it’s just a lot of work. So if, like me, you’re feeling a bit burned out, then that’s okay. Writing is hard.

Today’s prompt:

Was that death?

Dr Frost says yes.

I say I need proof.

Dr Frost says trust my memories—they are proof.

The sound of the gunshot, again and again and again. Is that proof?

Another excerpt from my novel! Today, think about how you write–what style do you use? A fun activity to try is to change your style based on what’s happening in the scene. Use shorter sentences to convey fast, choppy scenes. Try repetition or simpler words if your character is struggling to think. Try longer, descriptive language if your character is thinking or studying something.